UPDATE – 2 of these llamas have found a loving home.  Old man ‘Rocky’ will remain at The Sanctuary!

The breaking up of a home is hard on everyone, including any animals that may be part of the family.  Large animals are often excluded from the separation deal, simply because neither party has the land or facility or perhaps the time to look after them.  It is this very situation that is the most commonly encountered by The Llama Sanctuary. Some people walk away from the home and just leave the animals behind, waiting for some kind soul to realize their plight and seek help.  Thankfully, others take appropriate action and advertise for someone to take over the responsibility for their llamas.  Winter isn’t an easy time to re-home any animal, especially a large one that requires the investment of hay and bedding and shelter and this is a common story.

rescued llamas arrive at sanctuary
The chances are very slim of finding a new home for these three llamas during the winter.  When spring arrives and the grass is growing once more, then The Sanctuary will start spreading the word, seeking a suitable permanent home for Crystal, Mystique and Rocky.. They all behave very well on a halter, so training is not necessary, but in the meantime, we will be trimming toenails, giving them health checks and once the weather warms up, giving Rocky a haircut.  That is one huge coat he’s wearing!
If you believe you have the space, the facilities and the ability to care for three large llamas, Contact Us. Be sure to read the requirements for basic llama here and understand that caring for any animal carries a big responsibility.  A myth is circulating that llamas don’t need any special care; that they look after themselves and can survive in any conditions.  These are usually the llamas that experience the most abuse and the ones that are most difficult to handle when we receive the call to help.
Sirocco llama at The Llama Sanctuary